Kubernetes on AWS: An overview of KOPS

What is KOPS? Self described as “The easiest way to get a production grade Kubernetes cluster up and running” (on AWS (and others, see below)). KOPS looks a lot like Terraform. In broad strokes it takes cluster, context specific arguments and creates cloud resources that house and facilitate the usage of a Kubernetes cluster. KOPS Highlights Automates the provisioning of Highly Available (HA) clusters on AWS from the CLI, similar to helm or kubectl.
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Helm, Kubernetes ‘package management’, in a nutshell…

What is Helm? Helm is a Kubernetes package manager managed by CNCF, and started by Google and Deis. It packages multiple Kubernetes resources into a single logical deployment – a chart. Core Objectives Installing resources in Kubernetes should be easy like apt/yum/homebrew Teams should be able to easily collaborate Releases should be reproducible Packages should be sharable Building Blocks Helm consists of the following four resources: A chart is a package, a bundle of Kubernetes resources A release is an instance of a chart that has been loaded into a Kubernetes cluster (tiller) A repository is a collection of public charts A template is a kubernetes resource / configuration file consisting of Go/Sprig templating Client and Server A user (you, jenkins, etc…) uses the Helm CLI to communicate with Tiller, the Helm server.
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Kubernetes: Basics

What is Kubernetes Led by Google, the Kubernetes project aims to build a robust platform for running many containers. It allows for the automation of deployments, scaling, and management of containerized applications. Kubernetes enables teams to more effortlessly move workloads across cloud infrastructures by grouping containers into logical units for easy management and discovery. Why migrate to Kubernetes? more efficient use of cloud resources – resulting in cleaner architecture and huge potential savings in cloud costs removal of centralized team release responsibilities in lieu of specific functional teams decentralized schedule for release cycles across product areas Architecture: Master nodes A Kubernetes cluster is composed of two types of nodes; master nodes and worker nodes.
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